18 April 2014

The Ruby Reflector

Topic

Damien Katz

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By Damien Katz of Damien Katz 4 months ago.
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4 months off and I feel reborn.This time has meant everything to me and especially my kids.

I miss Couchbase terribly, but I'm also glad to be done and start a new chapter in my career. The thing I miss most are the great people there, super bright hard working folks who amazed me on a daily basis. Which, ironically, was the thing that made it easy to leave. Seeing the different teams taking the ball and running with it without me leading the charge. Things at Couchbase grew and matured …

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By Damien Katz of Damien Katz 7 months ago.
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Whoa, I have a blog. Weird.

As I take a break from all work (I left Couchbase about a month ago), one of things I'm trying to do is get the machine out of my head. Building a distributed database is a peculiar thing. Building a startup that sells distributed databases is a very peculiar thing. It did something weird to my brain. I'm still not sure what happened.

That moment in chess when I see the mistake, and it suddenly feels like the blood drains from my head. For me it's …

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By Klampaeckel of till's blog over 2 years ago.
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... is not Damien Katz.

TL;DR

The blog post Damien Katz wrote earlier today, doesn't mean much or anything for the Apache CouchDB project (or memcache project for that matter). If anything it's a public note that Damien Katz acknowledged that he moved (on) from CouchDB to Couchbase.

Short story, long

I'm not a contributor to CouchDB by means of code, (but) I blog a lot, I maintain the FreeBSD port, wrote a book and have an opinion on many things …

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By Mike Gunderloy of A Fresh Cup over 2 years ago.
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…for node.js.

quickie - Quick tests you can embed in your ruby classes. I rather like the idea of not having separate test files.

The Future of CouchDB - According to original author Damien Katz, it's the new Couchbase Server, not the existing Apache CouchDB project.

code.nasa.gov - Early alpha, serious open source code from the space agency.

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By scottswigart of How Software is Built almost 4 years ago.
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Scott: I want to be sensitive to the time. Are there any closing thoughts from your side?

Damien: We've just gone to version 0.11, which is our release candidate for 1.0. We've already been very stable as a database engine, and right now what we're actually trying to stabilize on is our program interface, and we're about ready to go.

Scott: Thanks for taking the time to talk today.

Damien: Thank you.

Bookmark this:

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On Litany Against Fear over 5 years ago.
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3) Damien Katz: Hugely inspirational talk. He sold his house, moved down to NC to write software he was passionate about. He's now writing CouchDB and it's part of the Apache project.

4) DHH : Talked about how RailsConf moved from 30 people meeting after RubyConf to a huge conference. He talked about how Ruby isn't on the fringe anymore. This is the "great surplus" speech, and it will end at some point. The mainstream will copy Rails, something new will …

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By Damien Katz of Damien Katz 12 months ago.
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We tend to think of working hard as a good thing. We value a strong work ethic and determination is the face of adversity. But if you are working harder than you should to get the same results, then it's not a virtue, it's a waste of time and energy. If it's your business systems that are working harder than they should, it's a waste of your IT budget.

Dynamo based systems work too hard. SimpleDB/DynamoDB, Riak, Cassandra and Voldemort are all based, at least in part, …

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By Damien Katz of Damien Katz 1 year ago.
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Hi Damien,

...

If I were to list projects as small, medium, and large or small to enterprise, what methodologies work across them? My thoughts are Agile works well, but eventually you'll hit a wall of complexity, which will make you wonder why you didn't see it many, many iterations ago. I don't know anyone at NASA or Space-X or DoD so I don't know what software methodology they use? Given your experience can you shed some light on it?

Regards,

Douglas

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By Damien Katz of Damien Katz 1 year ago.
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My post The Unreasonable Effectiveness of C generated a ton discussion on Reddit and Hacker News , nearly 1200 comments combined as people got in to all sorts of heated arguments. I also got a bunch of private correspondence about it.

So I'm going to answer some of the most common questions, feedback and misunderstandings it's gotten.

Is C the best language for everything?

Hell no! Higher level languages, like Python and Ruby, are extremely …

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By Damien Katz of Damien Katz over 1 year ago.
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For years I've tried my damnedest to get away from C. Too simple, too many details to manage, too old and crufty, too low level. I've had intense and torrid love affairs with Java, C++, and Erlang. I've built things I'm proud of with all of them, and yet each has broken my heart. They've made promises they couldn't keep, created cultures that focus on the wrong things, and made devastating tradeoffs that eventually make you suffer painfully. And I keep crawling back to C.

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