21 April 2014

The Ruby Reflector

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Mark Bates

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By Mark Bates of Meta Bates almost 3 years ago.
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Because I maintain several open source projects on Github I'm constantly getting emailed questions or issues, or people are always opening up tickets with bugs, issues, complaints, etc... And I really appreciate the feedback on these projects, I really do. What I would appreciate more is if instead of just opening a ticket, or sending an email, why not fork the project, fix it, and then contact me?

Now, I know that sounds like a lot of work, but honestly it's really not. Github

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By Mark Bates of Meta Bates almost 3 years ago.
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For the last few years every project or company I've worked for has started the same way, by setting up Basecamp, Lighthouse and Hoptoad (or similar ones anyway). Why? Basecamp - so we could share documents and todos. Lighthouse - so we could track our issues and bugs. Hoptoad - so we could track the errors our application was generating.

These are all very good applications and have served myself and my clients well, but they've suffered from several very big flaws. The …

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By Mark Bates of Meta Bates 3 years ago.
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In case you've been living in a cave this week you've probably heard that Ruby on Rails is going to be including both the CoffeeScript and SASS libraries, it will also make jQuery the default JavaScript framework, replacing the Prototype framework.

I would like to start by addressing my experiences with CoffeeScript. My opinion of it is of ambivalence. I've used it on a project, I've played with and in the end I've …

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By Mark Bates of Meta Bates 3 years ago.
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" Testing is painful."

" Testing is hard."

" Testing is complicated."

" Testing is not fun."

I hear those sorts of things all the time when I talk to people about testing. I agree that sometimes testing can be all of those things, but if you choose the right tools, the tools that best suite you, testing doesn't have to be. Let me give you an example of what I'm talking about, how choosing the right tools can make a huge impact on how you feel about testing.

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By Mark Bates of Meta Bates 3 years ago.
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So back in the dark ages of my career, pre-2006, I spent a long time coding Java. Yeah, I know, please don't judge. Anyway, In Java, for those of you who are unaware were two constructs that I occasionally wish I had in Ruby, those are Interfaces and Abstract Classes . The difference between these two constructs is suitable, but important.

In Java an Interface is a basically a blueprint of methods that the class who implements the Interface needs to implement. For example:

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By Mark Bates of Meta Bates over 3 years ago.
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Last week I received an email from someone who used to work at a company that I used to work with. I didn't know him, but he knew me through my work at the company, and my other exploits. He sent me an email to say that after a short time with the company he had been laid off, along with half of the development team. He wasn't looking for pity, but rather advice.

What kind of advice was he asking for, well, he quite simply needed to know how could he become an ‘expert' Ruby on Rails

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By Mark Bates of Meta Bates over 3 years ago.
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In a previous post, Testing Is Not An Option , I talked a lot about why you should write tests, and the arguments you can put forth to your client, manager, or whoever it may be as to why you should write tests. What I didn't talk about was how to start writing tests. So let's talk about that for a bit, shall we?

When I'm talking with a potential client, well at least a client that has an existing code base, I always ask what their code coverage stats are. Now, I know …

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By Mark Bates of Meta Bates over 3 years ago.
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In August I announced CoverMe a code coverage tool for Ruby 1.9. Well, today I announce that it has hit it's first release candidate! I've very excited by the fact it's getting close to an ‘official' release.

The response to CoverMe has been great and through feedback from the community I've made a lot of improvements and fixed a lot of issues.

While quite a few things have changed under the hood, not much has changed in how you use CoverMe.

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By Mark Bates of Meta Bates over 3 years ago.
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Testing in Ruby on Rails is incredibly easy. I mean stupidly easily. So easy that if you're not doing it, you are a very, very bad developer and should re-evaluate your career choices. (Yes, I believe in testing that much!) One thing that is not all that easy, however, is object creation and populating your test database. Five years ago when I first started working with Rails the only options we had to get data into the database were fixtures, or hastily written ‘factory'-esque methods custom to each application.

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By Mark Bates of Meta Bates over 3 years ago.
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Ruby 1.9(.2) is an amazing language to develop applications in. It's faster, more powerful, cleaner, and a huge improvement over Ruby 1.8.x. Because of those reasons every Ruby developer should move to this exciting new version of our language.

When making a move of this size it's important to have the right tools to help us along. Unfortunately, one of the most useful tools as a Ruby developer, RCov , does not work with Ruby 1.9.

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